Assistant Scoutmaster


Position Description
An assistant Scoutmaster is an adult leader over the age of 18 who helps the Scoutmaster deliver the promise of Scouting. Each Assistant Scoutmaster is assigned specific program duties by the Scoutmaster

Responsibilities
- Assist the Scoutmaster as directed
- Works with other responsible adults to bring Scouting to youth.
- Uses the methods of Scouting to achieve the aims of Scouting.
- Can be male or female, but must be at least 18 years of age.
- Is appointed by the Scoutmaster and approved by the Troop Committee Chair.
- Abide by the Scout Oath or Promise and the Scout Law.
- Subscribe to the precepts of the Declaration of Religious Principle
- All volunteers are expected to complete Youth Protection training. It is available online on the Web site http://olc.scouting.org. As a volunteer, you are expected to complete the training within 90 days of assuming a leadership position.




Current Assistant Scoutmasters



Scott Willoughby


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Contact:
Email: n/a
Phone: n/a

Bio
My name is Scott Willoughby. I have been involved, on and off, with the scouting movement since the age of eight. During that time I have achieved the rank of Eagle Scout, been an Assistant Scoutmaster, Troop Committee member, Cubmaster, Unit Commissioner, served on the District Committee and Thunderbird Club Roundtable and served on numerous camp staff positions at the H Roe Bartle Scout Reservation. In 2003, I was awarded the Silver Beaver, the highest honor that is given by a Boy Scout Council for service to youth. As Assistant Scoutmaster, it is my goal to do just that, assist. I wish to assist the youth and adults of this troop to leran more about themselves, to stretch and grow mentally and physically. After a lifetime of leadership and fellowship in various professional and community roles, some of the seemingly off hand ideas and skills I have learned, like tying knots, lighting firers, singing silly songs and telling shaggy dog stories have benefited those around me in a lighthearted way. “Where do you learn that?” “Boy Scouts” was my answer in the past. Now, and in the future, I want to be able to say “Scouts BSA”.